Saturday, July 11, 2009

Icelandic Viking-era farmhouse


One of the places I visited was the Viking-era farm at Stöng in Þjórsárdalur, and its replica, Þjóðveldisbærinn near the Búrfellsvirkjun hydro-electrical power station.

To get there, you turn off the road shortly before reaching Búrfellsvirkjun, onto a fairly good unpaved road and drive for about 15-20 minutes to reach the ruins. The house is believed to have fallen into ruin in the Hekla eruption of 1104.

The ruins were dug up by archeologists in the 1930s and 40s, and a house was built over them to shield them from the effects of wind and weather. Here you can see the side of the house. I wouldn't mind having a view like that:
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It's not a good idea to be there in the dark, since there is no electricity up there. Bring a flash if you want to take photos inside. The house could do with some repairs, as several windows are broken. The guest-book got filled in 2008.
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The layout of the building:
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A model of the building as it is thought to have looked like:
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Location: The Saga Museum, Hvolsvöllur.


Things you might have seen inside:
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The weaving room.
Location: The Þjóðveldisbær.

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A cooking pot hung from the ceiling. In the background are sleeping platforms.
Location: The Þjóðveldisbær.


What the inhabitants might have worn:
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Location: The Saga Museum, Hvolsvöllur.


A chapel outside the Þjóðveldisbær. The design is based on what the churches of the time are thought to have looked like, based on archaeological clues.
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A trough made of stone, outside the ruins at Stöng. It may have been for feeding animals or washing laundry. :
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A sod wall at the Þjóðveldisbær.
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